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1960s Slang that Will Remind You of Simpler Times

1960s_slang_terms

These days, throwbacks are one of the most popular trends of the internet. Pinterest is oozing with mid-century modern furniture. Recent styles have given nods to fashion from the 60’s. Even vintage camping gear is making a comeback. If you’re anything like us here at FamilyWise, you probably enjoy a good, old-fashioned throwback post yourself every now and then. It’s a well-known fact that nostalgia brings us together as families, communities, and as a species. That’s why we’ve compiled a list of some of the best 1960s words and phrases ever.

If you’re looking for some quirky adjectives or unique terms of phrase, you’ve come to the right place. These sayings will have you jumping back into your bellbottoms and gogo boots, flipping on The Brady Bunch, and settling in for a long night of peace signs, the Rolling Stones, and beehive hairstyles.

1960s Terms to Bring Out Your Inner Screaming Beatles Fan

“Foxy”

If you were considered a foxy individual back in the 60s, you were most likely one of the most attractive people in the room.

“What’s your bag?”

No, back in the day, this did not refer to someone’s luggage. Rather, it was another way to ask what issues someone was dealing with.

“Can you dig it?”

There was no other way to ask the question as to whether or not you were understood by the person you were speaking to. “Do you understand?” was simply not cool enough.

“Gimme some skin!”

No, this doesn’t mean what you think it means. It’s simply another way of asking for a handshake.

“Far Out!”

This essentially means that you approve of something or someone. You think something’s cool, you would describe it as “far out.”

“Old Lady”

This is a not-so-flattering term of endearment for your girlfriend or wife, although we don’t recommend calling them that to their faces.

“Hang Loose”

This one is probably one of the only sayings on our list that is still pretty well-known. It means “to chill out,” or to “hang out.”

“Freak Flag”

If you consider yourself to be a bit of a weirdo, then back in the 60s, you would have officially been in possession of a “freak flag.”

“Fuzz”

Who knows why this was another name for the cops? It could have had something to do with their buzzed hairstyles or doughnut mustaches.

“It’s a gas”

If something was described this way, it would have been a hilarious event. In other words, you would describe a comedy show as “a gas.”

“Bogart”

To bogart is to hog all the good stuff. If you’ve eaten the majority of the pizza, you’ve officially bogarted all the pizza.

“Bread”

This one is still in use today, mostly in the phrase, “Let’s get this bread.” Back in the 60s, it was synonymous with the word money.

“Beat feet”

This was a term that you would say if you had to get out of a situation quickly. Like, “let’s bounce!” or “let’s get outta here!”

“Bummer”

We all know the meaning of this one. If something is a bummer, then it probably didn’t happen the way it was supposed to happen.

“Outta Sight”

If something was described as “outta sight,” it was probably pretty unbelievable. This is what you’d use to describe a great view or a beautiful painting.

“Play Chicken”

Actually, this was a highly dangerous game teenagers played–revving their cars at each other because it was just the cool thing to do after school, I guess.

“Jazzed”

So there’s nothing expressly Gatsby about this word, but back in the day, it was simply another way of saying one was excited about something.

“Just for Kicks”

This is a phrase we still use today, but you might not know it was used frequently throughout the sixties in lieu of the phrase “just for fun.”

“Stoked”

If you were excited or looking forward to something, you might say you were pretty stoked about it.

“Chrome Dome”

This was basically just a crude nickname for a bald man. The kind of thing a group of punk kids would call you after egging your house and TPing your yard on Halloween… not so nice.

“Deuce”

All the hippies out there will know this one. If you’re one of those people that threw up a not-so-casual peace sign in every single photo from high school, anyone from the 60s would say you’re throwing up a deuce.

“Don’t flip your wig”

You would make this suggestion to a woman in panic mode. That is unless she’s reached the panic point of no return. In which case, you do not attempt to tell her to calm down–it will only make her more frustrated and she might physically assault you.

“Gnarly”

This term, which most of us today know to be used synonymously with words like “cool” or “awesome,” was used back in the 1960s as a word to describe something huge or difficult.

“In the groove”

If you were described as being “in the groove,” you were officially the epitome of cool.

“Mirror Warmer”

This was a way to insult someone who looks in the mirror too much.

“Mop-Top”

This is what you would call the hairstyle made trendy by the Beatles. It makes sense, seeing as how their hair did literally resemble a mop.

“Skuzz Bucket”

This would be what you would call a disgusting person or thing. For example, one would say, “Stop pickin’ your nose, ya skuzz bucket!”

“Five-finger discount”

If someone takes out a five-finger discount, it means they stole something. We don’t recommend trying to cash this particular coupon.

“Peggers”

This is another word for tight jeans with cuffed hems. If you were stylish back in the 60s, you definitely had a pair of peggers to strut around in–on the days you weren’t rocking your gogo boots, of course.

“All Show and No Go”

This essentially means someone is more beauty than brains, pretty with no substance.

“Around the Bend”

No, this isn’t a line from your favorite Disney movie songs, though it’s pretty close. If you were borderline crazy or strange back in the 60s, you would have been described as being “around the bend.”

“Baggies”

Why call them swim trunks when you could just call them baggies? There’s really nothing to be said for this one, other than the fact that the people of the 1960s were kind of eccentric when it came to, like, talking. After all, who needs normalcy when you can start replacing old-fashioned, traditional phrases with random, wonky, made-up ones just for the fun of it?

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1984: Big Brother, Big Economy, Big Happenings

1984

When George Orwell’s groundbreaking science fiction novel hit the market on June 8, 1949, it blew millions of American minds. Not only was it one of the most revolutionary novels of the 20th century, but it also established an expansive school of thought. Though the piece of fiction wasn’t exactly true to reality, it might pose the question, “What actually did happen in 1984?”

The economy was booming, DNA profiling was developed, and the space shuttle Discovery took its maiden flight. 1984 might not have gone down how Orwell predicted, but plenty of interesting stuff happened this year. Below we’ve compiled a list of the 25 biggest events of the year that made it so memorable.

What Happened in 1984?

1. Genetic fingerprinting/DNA profiling was developed.

Between two people, there are approximately three million different base pair DNA combinations. It was in 1984 that these microscopic differences began to be more widely used in forensic investigations to identify criminals. DNA profiling was a breakthrough for both the medical and criminal investigative communities.

2. The U.S. hosted the Summer Olympic Games in Los Angeles, California.

1984

Source: pikrepo.com

Not only was this the first Olympics to incorporate women’s marathon, women’s cycling, and synchronized swimming, but it also proved to be one of the more unique games in history. With Cold War sentiments still running rampant and in response to the US’s boycott of the 1980 Moscow Olympic Games, the USSR and fourteen additional Eastern Bloc countries neglected to participate in these games. With such a lack of competition, the U.S. made out with a record 83 gold medals.

3. Hong Kong returns to China.

Since the first Opium War of 1842, Hong Kong had operated under British rule as an entity separate from the Chinese communist government. UK Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and Chinese Premier Zhao Ziyang came to the Sino-British Joint Declaration on December 19, 1984, officially designating 1997 as the year Hong Kong would retain its capitalist, democratic systems while becoming a part of the Chinese government.

4. The first MTV Video Music Awards aired.

Back when music videos were just beginning to make their mark, MTV was the channel you wanted to be on. The first-ever Video Music Awards ceremony aired September 14, 1984, and featured iconic performances by Madonna, David Bowie, and Ray Parker, Jr.

5. Indira Gandhi was assassinated.

The Prime Minister of India led a successful campaign during her early years in the position (1966-76). After a few political losses and a shift in her party platform, she won the spot again in 1980 to serve for a fourth term. After a Sikh separatist movement took over the Holy Golden Temple in Amristar in 1984 and hundreds were killed, two of Gandhi’s bodyguards, both Sikh extremists, assassinated her.

6. The Apple Macintosh Super Bowl commercial aired.

Before Super Bowl commercials had become an entire industry in their own right, Apple set the bar when it premiered its Macintosh ad on January 22, 1984. The popular tech corporation, manned by Steve Jobs at the time, spent over $900,000 (the modern equivalent of $2.2 million) on the production of the commercial, making it one of the most expensive advertisements ever produced. Pictured above is the Macintosh computer itself. Was $900,000 worth the hype? Maybe, maybe not… we’ll leave it to you to decide.

7. Miners in the UK went on strike.

This might sound like something pretty old-fashioned, but believe it or not, miners were still going on strike when you or your parents were teenagers. The National Coal Board, an agency of Margaret Thatcher’s administration, was ready to cut around 20,000 jobs and close down 20 different collieries. Over 150,000 members of the National Mineworkers Union went on strike from 1984 to 1985 and brought national, economic, and industrial systems to a near standstill.

8. Band Aid raised awareness about childhood hunger in Ethiopia with a Christmas song.

A month before the Christmas of 1984, musician Bob Geldorf recruited top artists from Britain and Ireland to release a single that would raise awareness for childhood hunger in Ethiopia. The song sold a million copies the week of its release and hit the 3 million mark before the year was over.

9. English pound notes were taken out of circulation.

1984

Source: pikist.com

The English one pound note was removed from circulation in November of ’84 and replaced with a sturdier one pound coin (pictured above) by Chancellor Nigel Lawson. The note had circulated the market for over 180 years and featured Queen Elizabeth II.

10. CIA embassy director William Francis Buckley was abducted.

On March 16, 1984, this story broke headlines all across the nation. While outside his residence in Beirut, Lebanon, William Francis Buckley was kidnapped by jihadi extremists who believed he could be used in a prisoner exchange. He was subsequently held in captivity and allegedly tortured until he succumbed to his injuries and was returned to the U.S. to be buried a year later.

11. York Minster caught fire.

On July 9, York Minster erupted in flames in the early hours of the morning. For hours, York Fire Department fought to contain the flames but eventually had to collapse the south transept in order to save the remaining structure. The fire was caused by a lightning bolt and ended up costing £2.2 million worth of damage.

12. Union Carbide Plant leaked.

In December of 1984, tragedy struck the industrial city of Bhopal, India when the Union Carbide Industrial pesticide plant leaked methyl isocyanate gas (used in the production of insecticide sprays) into the city. Over the course of a day, the gas poisoned over 2,000 people and ultimately impacted over 200,000. With such long-lasting effects, this disaster is still impacting the people of Bhopal today.

13. The longest MLB game in history happened.

On May 8, 1984, the Chicago White Sox went up against the Milwaukee Brewers, running head to head over 25 innings, eight total hours, and two straight days. The only thing that could break the two teams up was a home run by Chicago’s Harold Baines, which secured the win for the White Sox 7-6.

14. A woman ran for vice-president for the first time.

Congresswoman Geraldine Ferraro was not the first female politician, but she certainly broke specific barriers that had been in place since America’s founding and continues to serve as an empowering figurehead to this day. In the 1984 election, she became the first female vice-presidential nominee to represent the Democratic party–or any major party, for that matter.

15. The National Cancer Institute successfully identified HIV.

1984

Source: pixnio.com

Since the early 80s, health officials, medical researchers, and specialists everywhere had worked tirelessly in the fight against AIDS, but it wasn’t until 1984 that a true breakthrough was made. Dr. Robert Gallo of the National Cancer Institute and his colleagues identified the retrovirus HTLV-III, or human immunodeficiency virus, which causes AIDS. It is a disease that has caused the deaths of approximately 700,000 people to date.

16. Michael Jackson’s hair caught on fire.

In 1984, Jackson’s ill-fated Pepsi-backed live concert went horribly haywire when a major polytechnics malfunction caused a stray spark to catch in his styled hair while he was performing, lighting him on fire. The pop star sustained second and third-degree burns on his face and scalp and retained scars for the rest of his life.

17. Eddie Murphy became a superstar.

The lovable comedian and actor shot straight to stardom after his work in the Hollywood Blockbuster flick, Beverly Hills Cop (1984). In addition to the fact that Axel Foley was Murphy’s first solo role, the movie ended up grossing over $315 million at the box office! It became the top-grossing film of the year and was deemed a pop-culture phenomenon, loved by generations of Eddie Murphy enthusiasts to this day.

18. Someone rode a hot-air balloon across the Atlantic for the first time.

1984

Source: pikrepo.com

In September of 1984, Joseph Kittinger, a retired U.S. Air Force Colonel, set out to make the first-ever transatlantic flight in a hot-air balloon. He departed from Caribou, Maine, and touched ground in Montenotte, Italy 86 hours later. In total, he and Rosie O’Grady’s Balloon of Peace traveled nearly 3,600 miles–pretty impressive!

19. Footloose became a cultural phenomenon!

1984

Source: Michael brown

We all know Kevin Bacon by name, and ever since he danced his way across the silver screen back in 1984, we haven’t been able to keep the obsession at bay. These days, he’s usually found playing a more somber character, but to us, he will always be remembered as the dancing, smirking city boy Ren McCormack.

20. Prince released Purple Rain–the song and the movie.

1984

Source: pixabay.com

The summer of 1984 was the summer to be listening to Prince. The rock musical drama film was nothing compared to the release of the song, which hit #2 on Billboard’s Hot 100 in the US for two consecutive weeks and #1 in Belgium and the Netherlands.

21. The space shuttle Discovery made its maiden voyage.

1984

Source: pikrepo.com

The morning of August 30, 1984 had every American looking to the skies for a glimpse of the space shuttle Discovery, which made its first-ever launch out of Kennedy Space Center at 8:42 am EDT. Discovery‘s dauntless crew consisted of five men and one woman, who successfully deployed the SBS-4 satellite, the Syncom satellite, and the Telstar satellite into orbit.

22. Bruce McCandless and Robert L. Stewart made the first-ever untethered spacewalk.

1984

Source: needpix.com

Keeping with the space theme, this is one not-so-small walk for man, and one ginormous spacewalk for mankind! On February 3, 1984, two brave astronauts took the first leap into the great big (and very literal) unknown–no strings attached. Sure, they had jetpacks, but that’s hardly comforting considering the vastness.

23. Reagan won the presidential re-election by a landslide.

1984

Source: pixabay.com

President Ronald Reagan was re-elected for his second four-year term in office on November 6, 1984, winning 49 of the 50 states. And, as if that wasn’t impressive enough, the president obtained a majority 97.6% of the electoral vote–the largest margin of any candidate in American history and a truly stunning feat.

24. The Soviet Union ditched the L.A. Summer Olympics.

So the Cold War was a lot more than psychological warfare, but this move was pretty much just that: psychological. After the U.S. boycotted the 1980 Moscow Summer Olympics, the Soviets saw it only fitting to return the favor, and subsequently opted out of the 1984 games. Blame it on the 102° L.A. traffic.

25. Ghostbusters broke the box office.

1984

Source: Sean Pultz

This spooktastic classic comedy came out the summer of 1984, shattering Columbia Pictures’ opening weekend record with a baffling $35 million in the box office, making it the highest-grossing comedy of all time (up to 1984, of course). The film was nominated for 2 Oscars and 3 Golden Globes, and its soundtrack–which featured Ray Parker Jr.’s original song “Ghostbusters”–was even in the running for a Grammy.

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20 Slang Terms from the 80’s

80s slang

So maybe Reaganomics and the Just Say No campaign didn’t particularly spike your interest back in the day, but there was much more to the 80s than politics, the Cold War, and the fall of the Berlin Wall. It was a time of big hair, big dreams, and Bon Jovi. If you can look past all of the cringe-worthy neon trends and legwarmers, you’ll find that this decade was also a shining time of phat catchphrases, choice sayings, and totally gnarly slang. If you lived through these years, you know exactly what we’re talking about.

Below we’ve compiled a list of the top 20 most iconic sayings of the decade, from quippy one-liners to full-on nonsense. So if you’re looking to incorporate some totally radical throwback terms into your vocabulary, look no further.

80s Slang that Will Have You Slidin’ Down Your Shades

1. “Cheeuh!”

80s slang 1

Source: 88mphpodcast.tumblr.com

This was just another way of saying yes or yeah, but with a scoff and an especially sarcastic tone.

2. “Tubular”

80s slang 2

Source: surfingworld.com

Though to you it may seem like an exclusive surfer term, the word tubular was synonymous with the word cool to everyone back in the 80s.

3. “Gag me with a spoon!”

80s slang 3

Source: tenor.com

This phrase was used to express disgust. It makes the word gross seem pretty dull in comparison.

4. “Bad”

80s slang 4

Source: zimbio.com

If something in the 80s was bad, you knew it was cool or trendy. Good was still good, of course, but bad was also good–makes sense, right?

5. “Bogus!”

80s slang 5

Source: austinchronicle.com

If you know this movie, you probably already know what this word means. Back in the 80s, if you found yourself stuck in or even witnessing a crappy situation, you would describe it as bogus.

6. “Don’t have a cow.”

80s slang 6

Source: giphy.com

This is a funnier way of telling someone to chill out. Kinda weird, right? Apparently, you only really deserved someone saying this to you if you were truly overreacting.

7. “No duh!”

80s slang 7

Source: gfycat.com

Seeing as how this is still a commonly used phrase, we already know that you already know what it means–no duh!

8. “Not even!”

80s slang 8

Source: gif-central.blogspot.com

If your answer to something was no, but you wanted to emphasize it, this is what you would say. It’s the 80s equivalent of the 90s saying, “As if!”

9. “Grody!”

80s slang 9

Source: gfycat.com

Back in the 80s, there was no more creative and emphatic way to express disgust than this word. Grody was an expression of extreme perturbation.

10. “Like totally!”

80s slang 10

Source: wattpad.com

This was a way to answer in the affirmative without really saying yes. For example, would we bring back staple 80s lingo if we could? Like, totally!

11. “Dude/Dudette”

80s slang 11

Source: tenor.com

It’s highly unlikely that you don’t know what this means, but just in case you don’t, we’ve got you covered. A dude or dudette is a particularly chill individual with a knack for chillin’ out and being cool.

12. “What’s your damage?”

80s slang 12

Source: pinterest.com

Back in the 80s, it was too much of an imposition to ask what someone’s problem was. You just had to dig a little deeper and accuse them of being emotionally damaged in some way.

13. “Choice”

80s slang 13

Source: pinterest.com

This would be used to describe someone or something particularly awesome or amazing. For example, you might say to someone, “That is a choice pair of shoes,” or “Choice ride, dude!”

14. “Gnarly!”

80s slang

Source: slapmagazine.com

If something was described as gnarly, it was a skill you wanted to gain, a product you wanted to have, or a person you wanted to be best friends with. This word described only the coolest of the cool and the awesomest of the awesome.

15. “Rad!”

80s slang 15

Source: theactionelite.com

Rad is still a widely used term to this day, and boy are we thankful it is! How else would we describe the most awesome parts of life?

16. “Wiggin’/ Wiggin’ out”

80s slang 16

Source: wifflegif.com

If someone is wiggin’ or wiggin’ out, this gif probably resembles their mental state. Duran Duran is an 80s icon, so his facial expression is a perfect fit for the meaning of the word.

17. “Eat my shorts!”

80s slang 17

Source: giphy.com

If someone were to say this to you, it meant they wanted nothing to do with you. It was a saying popularized by Bart Simpson–yet another example of how big of a deal The Simpsons was back in the 80s.

18. “Fresh”

80s slang 18

Source: biography.com

This word was used to describe something that was probably extremely new and hip. If something was fresh, it was the cool new thing.

19. “Bag your face!”

80s slang 19

Source: gifer.com

This was a particularly cruel insult that high school kids of the 80s came up with when someone’s facial appearance left something to be desired

20. “Lame”

80s slang 20

Source: gettrendygifs.wordpress.com

This word is still widely used today, meant to describe something dull or unoriginal. For example, a boring party would be described as lame.

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Groovy 70’s Slang

70s_slang

If you’re anything like us here at FamilyWise, you have tons of fond memories of the 70s. With all those disco balls and funky bellbottoms, it’s no surprise that this decade is one of the most iconic in terms of music, art, and quirky sayings. If you’re looking for ways to spice up your vocabulary or even just in the mood for some soulful nostalgia, you’ve come to the right place.

Below we’ve compiled a list of some fabulous and most groovy 70s slang terms and phrases. Take it from us, you don’t want to miss out on these excellent sayings, sensational words, and hilariously nifty expressions.

Portrait of young hippy woman in sunglasses at festival

70s Slang to Remind You of Trippier Times

“Dream On”

You would say this to an overambitious individual, someone who’s made a statement outside the realm of what you might consider realistic. In other words, if you’ve got to get someone’s head out of the clouds, this is what you would say to them. Short and not so sweet, but it gets the point across.

“Psyche”

This is another way of letting someone know you’ve tricked them or psyched them out.

“Bogue”

This word would have been used to describe an unbelievable idea, something so unrealistic that it was mildly offensive. In modern terms, it’s the response equivalent of “Not cool, man,” or “That’s bogus.”

“Crib”

This is simply a cooler way of referring to someone’s home or apartment.

Modern Bedroom

“Lay a Gasser”

We try to keep our content pretty clean here at FamilyWise, so we’ll leave you to guess what this one might mean. (Hint: Think stink!)

“Can You Dig It?”

So maybe your algebra teacher never phrased the question this way when teaching you variables, but if they had back in the seventies, any student would have understood exactly what they meant. This saying was simply another way of asking, “Do you understand?” or “Do you get it?”

“I gotta skitty!”

If you’ve ever used the word skedaddle, then you already know the proper usage of this word. The phrase all together means, “I have to hurry,” or “I’ve gotta’ rush.”

man riding bicycle

“Keep on stepping”

If you wanted someone to “get outta’ here” or “keep it moving,” you would say this to them.

“Later days”

This was just another way of saying goodbye or farewell.

“Let’s blow this taco stand!”

You’re at a party with your friends. The music has gotten repetitive and the chips are stale. What’s the most creative way you can think of to say “Let’s get out of here.” That’s exactly what this phrase is for.

“Let’s blow up the cheese!”

People of the 70s must have just not enjoyed saying “Let’s leave,” or “Let’s get outta’ here,” so they had to come up with a bunch of different ways to say it.

“Peace, love, and granola”

The hippies of the day really lived up to their name with this one. Rather than say goodbye, they’d just say “Peace, love, and granola,” before parting.

Peace sign and three friends

“Peace out, home fry”

Apparently, referring to your friends as fast-food wouldn’t have earned you a bunch of weird looks back in the 1970s. This was just another way to say goodbye or “See you later.”

“Catch you on the flip-side”

This was just another way of saying “I’ll see you later,” but, like, in a cool way. We don’t know exactly what is on the flip-side, but it must be a pretty cool place for everyone wanting to catch each other there.

Woman enjoying new day

“Do me a Solid”

This saying is another way to ask someone for a favor. Our guess is that it sounds less like an imposition when you say it in a hip, offhand way like this. The saying is still used today, so you’ve probably heard it once or twice.

“What a Fry”

And we’re back to the fast-food references. Not that there’s anything inherently wrong with calling someone a french fry–I mean, they are pretty delicious–but back in the 70s, if this particular phrase was said to you, it meant that you were acting weird or strange.

silly family

“The Skinny”

This is just another way to refer to a quick rundown of events, so the next time someone says to you, “Give me the skinny,” what they’re actually asking for is a quick overview of the situation.

“Far Out”

Though we’re pretty sure this is still a widely-used saying, we’ll let you know what it means, anyway. If something is “far out,” it’s probably pretty cool.

“Bunny”

If you were a cute girl in the 70s, you would’ve been considered a “bunny.” Don’t ask us why; we don’t exactly know.

Young brunette woman with retro and hippy style

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